Why we choose #IndieBound #buylocalfirst

By Trace Hentz, BHB founder

It’s apparent that many many people buy books online for the convenience.  It’s one-click, one-stop shopping,  especially if its Amazon.
But consider the impact on small community book stores.  Wouldn’t you prefer to step in a bookstore instead?
We are conscious of Amazon’s marketing finesse, of course.  Like the graphic shows, lost jobs hurt all of us.

But we love this alternative! IndieBound! You can purchase our book titles direct on their website (and use paypal)! Or they find a local bookseller for you to visit or direct you to their website to make your purchase!

http://www.indiebound.org/book/9780692615560

Stolen Generations is for sale there, with immediate delivery! LOOK

What is IndieBound?

A product of ongoing collaborations between the independent bookstore members of the American Booksellers Association, IndieBound is all about independent bookstores and the power of “local first” shopping.  Locally owned independent businesses pump money back into the their communities by way of taxes, payrolls and purchases.  That means more money for sound schools, green parks, strong police and fire departments, and smooth roads, all in your neighborhood.

Independent bookstores have always occupied a special place in communities.  Through IndieBound—and the Indie Next List flyers and Indie Bestseller Lists—readers find trusted bookseller curated reading options, newly discovered writers, and a real choice for buying.

IndieBound allows indie booksellers to communicate this vital role they play in their local economies and communities.  It allows authors to show their dedication to indies nationwide, easily done through linking to thousands of indie bookstores through IndieBound.org.  And it allows consumers to feel that their actions are a part of a larger picture—to know that their choices make a difference and that others are working toward the same goals.

Why support independents?

When you shop at an independently-owned business, your entire community benefits:
– Spend $100 at a local and $68 of that stays in your community. Spend the same $100 at a national chain, and your community only sees $43.
– Local businesses create higher-paying jobs for our neighbors.
– More of your taxes are reinvested in your community–where they belong.
– Buying local means less packaging, less transportation, and a smaller carbon footprint.
– Shopping in a local business district means less infrastructure, less maintenance, and more money to beautify your community.
– Local retailers are your friends and neighbors—support them and they’ll support you.
– Local businesses donate to charities at more than twice the rate of national chains.
– More independents means more choice, more diversity, and a truly unique community.

What are the Indie Next List & Bestsellers?

The monthly Indie Next List, drawn from bookseller-recommended favorite handsells, epitomizes the heart and soul of passionate bookselling. The weekly Indie Bestseller Lists are most current snapshot of what’s selling in indie bookstores nationwide.  View both lists online here at IndieBound.org, or check your local independent bookstore for printed versions.

Can I buy books on IndieBound.org?

There are two ways to purchase books through IndieBound.org: (1) The “Buy Now” button on every book page allows readers to purchase the book immediately, and the sale will support the entire network of independent bookstores. (2) By entering a zip code in the “Shop Local” box, readers will be able to choose from among the websites for a list of independent bookstores near them.  They will then be transferred to the selected store’s website to complete the purchase.

What criteria does a store have to meet to be listed on IndieBound.org?

All the stores that are listed on IndieBound.org are members of the American Booksellers Association.

 

I hope you will share this post widely on social media. Let’s support small local book stores and IndieBound.

Save

BLUE NEWS: Calling All Poets

Blue Hand Books is seeking poetry submissions for an upcoming publication; book four in our collection, The Lost Children book series.  Author Patricia Busbee is editing this volume. (The title of the new book is still taking shape). We are interested in both emerging and established writers.  Heartfelt and genuine writing is valued.  We are looking for pieces that address the often overlooked and complex histories of American Indian First Nations.  Areas of particular interest are Indian-boarding schools, adoption and foster care.  We are also interested in these issues from a contemporary perspective. 
There is an August 1st deadline. We accept poems of any length. Send up to three poems. We like free verse, prose poems, experimental and traditional forms. Please include a bio with your submission. Also include a URL to your blog or website, if applicable.  Please send submissions to Book Editor patriciabusbeewriter@gmail.com or BHB Publisher larahentz@yahoo.com.
A few ideas to spark your creative process: Buried trauma, raw truths, ancestors, ancestral memory, reclaiming, reimagining, the healing power of the land, coming home, full circle and future generations.
[Writers will be compensated in book copies.]
****
Book One: Two Worlds
Book Two: Called Home: The Roadmap (second edition coming soon)
Book Three: Stolen Generations

BHB Web site LogoBlue Hand Books Collective is a small Native American-owned publishing company based in western New England.  Our website: www.bluehandbooks.org

On Twitter: @BlueHandBooks

Please share this announcement with all your poet friends.  Mention it on your blogs, in social media outlets, podcasts and newsletters.  We need your help to grow this publishing collective so please share our Blue News updates and yes, a big thank you, chi megwetch, pilamaye, wado, merci, for your interest and continued support!

Save

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: New anthology sheds new light on the STOLEN GENERATIONS

Published 4-20-16

Published 4-20-16

Greenfield, Massachusetts [2016]  — Award-winning Native journalist Trace Hentz continues her heart-rending efforts to peel away the malodorous layers of Native American adoption with her newest book, Stolen Generations: Survivors of the Indian Adoption Projects and 60s Scoop (Publisher Blue Hand Books).

“What is significant about this new book?  Everything,” Hentz said.  “Ten years ago there were no books on stolen generations.  Now we have more than one generation who have experienced the Indian Adoption Projects and 60s Scoop.  These survivors have bravely documented their life experience in their own words in three anthologies (Two Worlds, Called Home and now Stolen Generations) that I’ve compiled so far.”

Hentz (formerly DeMeyer) has worked tirelessly since 2004 to shed light on the dark corners and secret crevices of American Indian adoptions, and by extension, all adoptees.

“For me, that is all I hoped for, prayed for,” Hentz said.  An adoptee herself, Hentz reunited with her own birth family over the past 20 years.  Her late-father  Earl was Shawnee-Tsalagi and Euro mix.  “I had to do something, as a journalist and as an adoptee to end the secrecy.”

When adoptees do start asking about their birth parents they often run into a wall of silence.  Hentz offers to help them and often refers them to work with Librarian Karen Vigneault-MLIS, a member of the Iipay Nation of Santa Ysabel in California, who can provide genealogy and research for no charge.

In the case of a First Nations adoptee in the US or Canada, being unable to trace a birth parent can deny that adoptee and their child(ren) their rightful place on tribal rolls, their rights to ancestral land, and may disqualify them from tribal benefits they qualify for and deserve.

Indian adoption is nothing new, nor has the essential purpose changed.

It was long common policy to take Indian children from their families and communities and to place them in non-Native homes or send them to residential boarding schools.  In fact three contributors in Stolen Generations were the children of parents who had also been adopted out.

In 1978 tribes fought to get the Indian Child Welfare Act approved by the federal government.  ICWA’s intent is to keep Native children in tribal communities.

However, even now, some in Congress seek to overturn the ICWA.

“We are the pre-ICWA adoptees – before the federal law was signed, preventing adoption to non-Indian parents, thereby lawfully supporting kinship-care adoption so First Nations children remain in their community,” Hentz explained.

Stolen Generations is an anthology, letting adoptees tell their own stories, in their own words.

“For these adoptees and their adult children, it takes real courage to think about the past and try to make sense of it,” Hentz said.  “Many of us thought we were the only one.  I know I did.  Many of us felt very alone, isolated, confused.”

The introduction to Stolen Generations was written by Johnathan Brooks (Northern Cheyenne). Trace Hentz (Shawnee-Cherokee mix) wrote the preface.

Among the other contributors are author Patricia Busbee (Cherokee), Joseph Henning (Cree), Leland Pacheco Kirk (Navajo), Susan Devan Harness (Confederated Salish Kootenai Tribes), author Dana Lone Hill (Oglala Lakota), Rebecca Larsen (Quinault Indian Nation),  Nakuset (Cree), and Joshua Whitehead (Peguis First Nation Manitoba). (Read complete list of contributors below)

“They told their story in their own way in their own words,” Hentz said. “As you read this book, you will see Native adoptees must overcome many barriers preventing them from uniting with their own tribal families, to regain status as enrolled tribal citizens.

“It’s widespread (in Canada and the US) and it’s a growing issue,” she said.  “With sealed adoption records and the Bureau of Indian Affairs not actively helping, adoptees might wait years to rejoin their tribes and reclaim sovereignty.”

Hentz will continue fighting for the many generations affected by the various Indian Adoption Projects and 60s Scoop, supporting ICWA’s intent, using her blog American Indian Adoptees (www.splitfeathers.blogspot.com.)

“I just want to spare a future child the pain and loss we felt,” Hentz said.

###

ISBN-13: 978-0692615560 (Blue Hand Books) 

Paperback $12.96 

Kindle ebook $3.96

Stolen Generations: Survivors of the Indian Adoption Projects and 60s Scoop: Lost Children of the Indian Adoption Projects (Book 3)

An anthology of adoptees’ firsthand accounts and historical background of the Indian Adoption Projects and 60s Scoop in North America

Contributors:

INTRO: Johnathan Brooks (Northern Cheyenne)

Preface: Trace Hentz (Shawnee-Cherokee mix)

Joseph Henning (Cree)

Leland Pacheco Kirk Morrill (Navajo)

Nakuset (Cree)

Debra Newman (Choctaw Cherokee)

Belinda Mastalski Smith (Oneida New York)

Janelle Black Owl (Mandan, Hidatasa, Turtle Mountain Chippewa, Lakota)

Susan Devan Harness (Confederated Salish Kootenai Tribes)

Dana LoneHill (Oglala Lakota)

Joy Meness (Iroquois)

Levi William EagleFeather Sr. (Sicangu Lakota)

Patricia Busbee (Cherokee)

Karl Mizenmayer (Minnesota Ojibwe)

Mitzi Lipscomb (Walpole Bkejwanong First Nations)

Rebecca Larsen (Quinault Indian Nation)

Joseph M. Pierce (Cherokee)

Mary St. Martin (Koyukon Athabascan)

Joshua Whitehead (Peguis First Nation Manitoba)

 

COVER ARTIST: Terry Niska Watson (White Earth Ojibwe adoptee) 

“This illustration I painted years ago when I was in a very dark place in my life.  This is a painting of a subject matter that has always drawn my interest, that is the Native life and the beauty of tradition, family and nature.  As my sister, Elizabeth Blake, said about this painting that still hangs on my wall, “the most interesting part is that the face is not visible.  That is how it is when you do not know your birth family.”

 

BOOK PREVIEW LINK:  Once Upon A Time (via pressbooks)

###

Blue Hand Books Collective is a small Native American-owned publishing company based in western New England.  Website: http://www.bluehandbooks.org

Media Contact: Trace Hentz, Greenfield, Massachusetts, 413-258-0115 (google message) Email: larahentz@yahoo.com

BOOK PDF available for reviewers.  For interviews with book contributors, contact Trace.

Stolen Generations hits Amazon

Why it’s so important? #ICWA #adoption #stolengenerations

If you thought that ethnic cleansing was something for the history books, think again…
Book One

By Trace Hentz, editor of the new book STOLEN GENERATIONS and founder of Blue Hand Books

In the last few days, I checked the book reviews in the UK (England) and was so happy to read this great honest review for Two Worlds by Yassmin. She gets it! (read her quote above and the review below)

The writers in the first anthology Two Worlds (Book 1) broke new ground. They told their story in their own way in their own words. (I like to tease them and call them rock stars.)  We are the pre-ICWA adoptees – before the federal law was signed, preventing adoption to non-Indian parents and thereby supporting kinship adoption when children remain in their tribal community.

For these adoptees, it takes real courage to think about the past and try to make sense of it.  Many of us adoptees thought we were the only one…  I know I did.

Many of us felt alone, isolated, confused.

Then we have to look at the reunion aspects of our journey with relatives and parents, and doing that we reconnect to our sovereign nations again.  Maybe we were already enrolled, maybe not.  Maybe we have land to inherit, maybe not.  (The purpose of these adoptions was to erase us, end our rights, take our land and erase “the Indian” us off the BIA books.)

Book 2 (40 adoptees +)

Now in 2016 I find that we have more than one generation who was affected by the various Indian Adoption Projects.  We have adult children of adoptees who are living their own identity issues… and they have questions.  Two of these men wrote in the new book Stolen Generations.  Their parent was adopted out.

Can you see how widespread this is (in Canada and the US) and how it’s a growing  problem?  The problem is exasperated by states with sealed adoption records and the Bureau of Indian Affairs who is not actively helping us adoptees rejoin our tribes. 
The deception is obvious – their point was to not have any of us be Indian and enrolled!

1 of 1 people found the following helpful
Thought-provoking and moving 11 October 2012

Two Worlds – Lost children of the Indian Adoption Projects

If you thought that ethnic cleansing was something for the history books, think again. This work tells the stories of Native American Indian adoptees “The Lost Birds” who continue to suffer the effects of successive US and Canadian government policies on adoption; policies that were in force as recently as the 1970’s. Many of the contributors still bear the scars of their separation from their ancestral roots. What becomes apparent to the reader is the reality of a racial memory that lives in the DNA of adoptees and calls to them from the past.
The editors have let the contributors tell their own stories of their childhood and search for their blood relatives, allowing the reader to gain a true impression of their personalities. What becomes apparent is that nothing is straightforward; re-assimilation brings its own cultural and emotional problems. Not all of the stories are harrowing or sad; there are a number of heart-warming successes, and not all placements amongst white families had negative consequences. But with whom should the ultimate decision of adoption reside? Government authorities or the Indian people themselves? Read Two Worlds and decide for yourself.

LINK

What is significant about this new book? Everything. 10 years ago there were no books. Now we have more than one generation who experienced the Indian Adoption Projects and 60s Scoop.

We have documented new history in our own words in Three Books!

For me, that is all I hoped for, prayed for… I have been reunited with my own family over 20 years….and because I feel as I do doesn’t mean adoption will ever change… it probably won’t.

I am a voice in the wind… I just want to spare a child the pain of secrecy, lies, hurt, loss.

“Stolen Generations” is available for pre-order in the Kindle Store. It is available* for customers to pre-order here.

PAPERBACK HERE: https://www.createspace.com/5982643

Ebook proceeds will benefit the IronEagleFeather Project for adoptees. Levi and I are creating a safe haven and workshops for adoptees…

Contributors:

INTRO: Johnathan Brooks (Northern Cheyenne)

Joseph Henning (Cree)

Leland Pacheco Kirk Morrill (Navajo)

Nakuset (Cree)

Debra Newman (Choctaw Cherokee)

Belinda Mastalski Smith (Oneida New York)

Janelle Black Owl (Mandan, Hidatasa, Turtle Mountain Chippewa, Lakota)

Susan Devan Harness (Confederated Salish Kootenai Tribes)

Dana LoneHill (Oglala Lakota)

Joy Meness (Iroquois)

Levi William EagleFeather Sr. (Sicangu Lakota)

Patricia Busbee (Cherokee)

Karl Mizenmayer (Minnesota Ojibwe)

MITZI LIPSCOMB/ROSEMARY BLACKBIRD (Walpole Bkejwanong First Nations)

Rebecca Larsen (Quinault Indian Nation)

Joseph M. Pierce (Cherokee)

Mary St. Martin (Koyukon Athabascan)

Joshua Whitehead (Peguis First Nation Manitoba)

 

COVER ART: Terry Niska Watson (White Earth) 

This illustration I painted years ago when I was in a very dark place in my life.  This is a painting of a subject matter that has always drawn my interest, that is the Native life and the beauty of tradition, family and nature.  As my sister, Elizabeth Blake, said about this painting that still hangs on my wall, “the most interesting part is that the face is not visible.  That is how it is when you do not know your birth family.”

PREVIEW:  Once Upon A Time

Stolen Generations (Book 3)

Survivor Narratives of 60s Scoop and First Nations adoptees

An anthology of adoptees’ firsthand accounts and the historical background of the Indian Adoption Projects and 60s Scoop in North America

ISBN-13: 978-0692615560 (Blue Hand Books) 

Paperback $12.96 

Kindle ebook $3.96
Email for more information: larahentz@yahoo.com
On Kindle (click country): US UK DE FR ES IT NL JP BR Canada MX AU IN  
Source: AMERICAN INDIAN ADOPTEES

 

[Blue Hand Books has published 17 books since 2011]